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  • Edmond Remie Gray

Does The Liberian Government Have a Policy to Accommodate Deported Liberians?


Without a doubt, on or before March 31, 2018, Liberian nationals benefiting from the Obama administration’s extended Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) could be detained and deported to Liberia without little or no explanation from the Trump’s administration.

Since the early 1990s, Liberians in the United States have enjoyed sanctuary status due to our brutal civil carnage which claimed the lives of a quarter or so million Liberians.

Temporary protected status for Liberians has been honored by successive U.S. Administration up to Obama.

The last extension by the Obama’s administration is set to expire on March 31, 2018 (https://www.uscis.gov/news/news-releases/deferred-enforced-departure-extended-liberians-us). That is, provided the Trump administration maintains the humanitarian gesture.

Temporary immigration statuses are just what they are, all but permanent. Under this new Trump administration, nothing is guaranteed.

Many communities with foreign ties are on the edge. Upon termination of DED, those Liberians on such status will be residing in the United States illegally, and subjected to enforced deportation when picked up.

To keep them in check, U.S. Immigration could request them to periodically check in with their local Immigration Custom Enforcement (ICE) office.

Up till her deportation by ICE this week, Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos, mother of two

American born children reported with ICE annually for nine years. Under U.S. Immigration regulations, checking in periodically with ICE is not uncommon for out-of-status immigrants with pending deportation cases. Provided you stay out of trouble, your work authorization may or may not be renewed.

And with the Trump administration constant threat to withhold federal funding to U.S. Cities that are refusing to honor Public Law 104-208 or Sanctuary Cities for short, many municipalities will start turning over illegal to ICE.

Accordingly, PL 104-208 passed in 1996 by the 104th U.S. Congress, and also known as the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA), obliged local governments to cooperate with Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Agency; on the contrary, “a number of urban, suburban, and rural communities have simply ignored the law, and adopted so-called sanctuary policies.”

Accordingly, municipalities that have adopted sanctuary policies against IIRIRA, simply instruct their local or state not to notify the feds of the presence of illegal persons residing or going through their jurisdictions. Sanctuary jurisdictions sometimes extend access to similar taxpayer funded programs and benefits available to legal permanent resident aliens.

Although the recent Trump Executive Order that temporarily prohibited immigrations from seven majority Muslim nations may have been rejected at the Federal level, many believe that the temperament of the administration is immigrant unfriendly.

For instance, aboard Air Force One on late on Friday, President Trump was reportedly promised to pursue a new travel ban executive order, while reevaluating his chances of pursuing the legal dispute surrounding the administration’s original travel ban order to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In a step that triggered the most serious legal confrontation yet for the new Republican administration, Trump two weeks ago issued an executive order banning entry into the United States by refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries, triggering nationwide protests and legal challenges.

A federal judge in Seattle last week issued a temporary restraining order putting the travel ban on hold. That suspension was upheld by an appeals court in San Francisco on Thursday, raising questions about Trump's next step.

In a surprise visit with reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Florida from Washington, Trump said he was considering "a brand new order" that could be issued as soon as Monday or Tuesday if he decides to move in that direction.

After a White House official said the administration was not planning to escalate the legal dispute to the Supreme Court, Priebus told reporters late on Friday such a move was still possible.

"Every single court option is on the table, including an appeal of the Ninth Circuit decision on the TRO (temporary restraining order) to the Supreme Court, including fighting out this case on the merits," Priebus said.

"And, in addition to that, we're pursuing executive orders right now that we expect to be enacted soon that will further protect Americans from terrorism."

Trump's order, which he called a national security measure meant to head off attacks by Islamist militants, barred people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering for 90 days and all refugees for 120 days, except refugees from Syria, who are banned indefinitely.

Trump could rewrite the order to explicitly exclude green card holders, or permanent residents, said a congressional aide familiar with the matter who asked not to be identified. Doing that could alleviate some concerns with the original order expressed by judges in the 9th Circuit court where it is being tested.

On Air Force One, Trump said regarding the 9th Circuit court fight: "We will win that battle. The unfortunate part is that it takes time statutorily ... We need speed for reasons of security."

An official familiar with Trump's plans said if the order is rewritten, among those involved would likely be White House aide Stephen Miller, who was involved in drafting the original order, as well as officials of the National Security Council, Justice Department and Department of Homeland Security.

Independently of the Trump administration, an unidentified judge on the 9th Circuit requested that the court’s 25 full time judges vote on whether the temporary block of Trump’s travel ban should be reheard before an 11 judge panel, known as en banc review, according to a court order. The 9th Circuit asked both sides to file briefs by Thursday.


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Edmond Remie Gray, is one of your humble hosts and Founder and President of Radio Wish FM. He can be reached at remiegray@gmail.com
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